Interstellar

Christopher Nolan is the director of some great films and someone who clearly holds cinema very dearly and wants it to not just survive but to thrive. After a string of hits he is apparently more or less able to make the films he wants the way he wants, but I can’t help thinking that the old adage that constraints help creative thinking applies a little bit here. I mean, take a look at the graph below.

There’s a worrying trend there! So let’s cut to the chase – this film could have done with loosing 40 minutes and not just because it’s too long – the entire last act didn’t really work for me. I found that there was an awful lot of completing the circle that didn’t need to be done: more than that, would have been better not done. Which is a shame because there are some spectacular and enjoyable sections and it is certainly an ambitious film that lives up to the epic name.

It starts in a near-future dystopian landscape of failing crops and dust storms in what is presented as a world of corn fields and a diminished human species. At the same time there are vox-pops reminiscing about the times of hardship, so we already know that we are watching the past as far as the film universe is concerned and that there is a better outlook in the present.

Matthew mcconaughey is convincing as Cooper, the former NASA pilot running a farm but desperate to punch out of the stifling, future-less world. Cooper’s father-in-law Donald (Jon Lithgow) is resigned to the current situation, his son wants to be a farmer too but his daughter’s dreams are in the stars.

After a lot of scene-setting we seem to leave the farm all at once and it is then exciting as things are building, which helps to hide the large amounts of exposition at times. This is where the film shines with some spectacular settings, realistic in-film mechanics and inspired plot devices (but some dodgy robots!). Hans Zimmer’s score is much more stripped down than previously and there are a lot of loud simple organ sounds which will no doubt become familiar over the next few years.

And then it’s a shame as we arrive at the last 40 minutes or so and the pages of the plot seem to come apart and flutter away in the breeze. It’s an enjoyable watch for most of the film, but ultimately ephemeral.

3 on 5

Info
Director: Christopher Nolan
Starring: Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, Jessica Chastain, Bill Irwin, Ellen Burstyn, Michael Caine, Matt Damon, Casey Affleck UK Release: 29th October 2014

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